Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven Front Range Orthopedics & Spine

 

Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven 

 Patient Reviews and Testimonials

 


 

Heather Corey
Surgeon: Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven
Reason for orthopedic care:  Talus Bone Surgery

Heather Corey Ankle Surgery - Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven Front Range Orthopedics And Spine

Heather Corey -Ankle Surgery- Dr Gregg Koldenhoven Front Range Orthopedics And Spine

“Dr. Koldenhoven - I have enclosed a photo of my recent trip to Ireland to illustrate my joy & success with the results of your 12/30/11 Talus bone surgery.  On this trip to Ireland I was able to fulfill a couple of dreams – horseback riding across the hills of Ireland and dancing on the shores of Galway Bay.  None of this would have been possible if not for your expert help.  I was mentally thanking you with every step!  Thank you for keeping me dancing!” – Heather Corey

Todd Van Selus
Surgeon: Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven
Reason for orthopedic care: ankle pain due to sprain


 Dr. Koldenhoven Review by Todd Van Selus   Dr. Koldenhoven Review by Todd Van Selus

 

“Dr. K strikes the perfect balance of proper healing withunderstanding that it’s all about getting back to the enjoyment of life.I always knew I was getting the straight truth from him, which gaveme the confidence to stay active while in a walking boot. It’s obviousgetting his patients back on both feet is his #1 priority.” -Todd


 

front range orthopedics and spine, patient testimonial, total ankle replacement testimonial

Florence McKinney
Surgeon: Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven
Reason for orthopedic care:  Ankle Replacement

SurgeryAt first glance, you would never guess Florence McKinney has a bionic ankle. This sweet woman, in her mid-70s, is still active and enjoying life. Every day you will find Florence and her husband, Francis, taking 1.5 to 2 mile walk. "My (ankle) replacement has great range of motion".

Florence's ankle complications began, by accident, on a November morning in 1974. On a Saturday morning, after a light snow the night before, Florence headed to Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church in Estes Park to practice the organ. When it was time to go she decided to take a short cut across the lawn instead of using the steps. With that decision, her fate was sealed. Florence fell, sliding down the three foot embankment and slamming her right foot into the sidewalk. "I thought 'Oh God, help me!'"

One plate and two screws later, Florence was cast from hip to toe. "The full leg cast was on for seven weeks." Within six months, Florence made a full recovery and was back to her life's journey, "I didn't have any problems until about five years ago."

Florence's pain had progressed to the point that she realized she needed to do something drastic. Upon a consultation with Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven, Foot & Ankle Specialist at Front Range Orthopedics and Spine, she was given three options: live with the pain, a fusion or a total joint replacement.

Dr. Koldenhoven counseled Florence on her decision about whether or not a total ankle replacement was the right choice for her, "Age, lifestyle and goals for long-term activities are all important components of deciding whether someone is a good candidate for total ankle Arthroplasty," responded Dr. Koldenhoven. "With Florence, I purposefully explained the benefits of all three choices."

Florence was in his office to get rid of the pain so living with it wasn't an option. She didn't like the idea of a fusion because she didn't want to lose her motion. Her only choice left was a total ankle replacement. "Together we made an informed decision on her proper course of treatment," said Dr. Koldenhoven.

The decision was made. Florence chose the total ankle replacement. 

It is common knowledge in the medical field that ankle replacements do not typically have the lifespan of a knee or shoulder replacement; however, now there is a newer technology on the market known as the "INBONE" by Wright. Dr. Koldenhoven's comments on the INBONE device, "I feel the (INBONE) technology has really made a difference with regards to advancing total ankle Arthroplasty. It has excellent fixation of the components which likely will translate into a longer lifespan of the device in patients. The company continuously studies the components to see if there are potentially any further improvements that can be made to the design."

The INBONE device is expected to take much more wear and tear, while being a less invasive surgical procedure. According to Wright, "The INBONE Ankle modular design feature of the tibial stem allows the physician to select the appropriate number of pieces based on patient size and bone structure. This results in a more precise fit and less-invasive installation process with minimal bone removal. Other procedures offer only stems available in a specific size which does not allow a customizable fit." An added bonus: many of the engineers designing this technology are located right here in Colorado.

Today Florence and her husband enjoy regular walks, retirement, and yes, Florence still plays the organ (once a month) at church.

When asked whether or not Florence would recommend the procedure to someone else, she responded, "Mine went so well I would encourage them to do it. If the doctor gives them that option, I don't have any reservation about it."


Richard Juday
Surgeons: Dr. Robert FitzGibbonsDr. Gregg KoldenhovenDr. Timothy Pater
Reason for orthopedic care: left knee replacement, cortisone injections to right knee, trigger finger release

Front Range Orthopedics & Spine patient, Dr. Richard Juday (pictured in green), awarded Dr. FitzGibbons (left) and Dr. Koldenhoven (right) with his medals he recently won at the 2014 Badminton State Games.

Dr. FitzGibbons Review Dr. Koldenhoven ReviewDr. FitzGibbons Review Dr. Koldenhoven Review

“You've heard of ‘re-gifting’ an item at Christmas?  Well, I am expressing my gratitude most recently by ‘re-awarding’ my medals from the July 2014 State Games.” Dr. Juday explained. “The doctors at Front Range have allowed me to maintain a happy and active lifestyle.” 

Dr. Juday has been playing competitive badminton, on a national level, since 1960.  “A lifetime sport is good for you but it takes a toll on the body; nonetheless, I can’t stress enough the importance of having a lifetime sport,” Dr. Juday said. Moreover, Front Range Orthopedics & Spine surgeons have contributed to Dr. Juday's ability to continue to play badminton, hike Colorado's mountains, mow the lawn and generally keep up with his wife.  

Recently Dr. Juday and his wife went on a backpacking trip:  12 miles round trip; 40 pound packs; 2,700 feet in elevation gain.  His left knee (with the replacement) handled the trek like a champ, “I don’t even think about that knee.  It’s strong, stable and pain free,” Dr. Juday commented.  Nonetheless, Dr. Juday is now having issues with his right knee.  Currently, Dr. Koldenhoven is helping manage his right knee with cortisone injections.  There may be a right knee replacement in the future, but Dr. Juday doesn’t seem concerned.

Dr. Juday has lived, and continues to live, life to the fullest.    His confidence in the doctors and staff at Front Range Orthopedics & Spine are proving to meet and exceed his expectations as a patient.  To date he is a patient of Dr. FitzGibbons, Dr. Koldenhoven and Dr. Pater (Dr. Pater has performed a trigger finger release for Dr. Juday).

*Dr. Richard Juday, an electrical engineer retired after 35 years at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, is the beneficiary of having been taught a lifetime sport, badminton, in his undergraduate days at Rice University.  Although badminton is not the first sport that might come to mind when one hears the word "racquet", it ranks first among the racquet sports (including tennis, table tennis, squash, and racquetball) when champion-level players have been monitored for heart rate.  These conditions make it so demanding: Play is continuous rather than having, say, all the ball-thumping associated with preparation for service in tennis; the shuttle is hit in the air without being allowed to bounce; the court is open rather than have walls to return the projectile into play, as in racquetball; the court is artfully just so large that a player can barely cover it; effective offensive play is to cause your opponent to move the greatest distance; and service is designedly defensive, to start a long rally in which a positional advantage must be developed, rather than making service aces possible.  


 

Russell LeabchAnkle Doctor
Surgeon: Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven
Reason for orthopedic care: remove a cyst

Russell (Russ) Leabch is no stranger to the championship podium; however, in December of 2011 he thought his career had come to an end.

“I had a bulge on my ankle,” Russ said. “The bigger it got the more it hurt because it was pushing on a nerve.”

Russ had been diagnosed with a ganglion cyst on his ankle.  A ganglion cyst is a swelling that often appears on, or around, joints and tendons in the hand or foot. 

Russ’s cyst had become so painful that he opted to have it removed.

 “I had to learn how to walk again,” Russ said after surgery. “I had a lot of atrophy. One leg was muscular from weight lifting and the other was skinny.”

Less than a year later, Russ went to California to compete in the American Masters Olympic Weight Lifting competition. Russ brought home the gold.

 

When you ask Russ about his recovery he says, “They (Front Range Orthopedics) wouldn’t quit on me. They really made the difference.”

“Dr. Koldenhoven is the nicest guy,” Russ said with a smile on his face and a gold medal in his hand.

*Olympic weight lifting has two competition lifts: the snatch and the clean and jerk. This is the ultimate sport of strength and power and should not be confused with power lifting, bodybuilding, or general weight training. Olympic weight lifting tests an individual’s ‘explosive strength’, demonstrating more mobility and a greater range of motion than other lifts. When properly executed, the snatch and the clean and jerk are both dynamic and explosive while appearing graceful.


Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven Review by Ron MadridRon Madrid
Surgeon: Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven
Reason for orthopedic care: fractured heel

A year ago, Handyman Ron Madrid was on a ladder installing electrical conduit.  The ladder shifted and Ron jumped.  When he landed, he landed hard and directly on his heel. “I originally thought it was a bruise, but later found out I fractured my heel and I needed surgery,” Ron said.  

Ron had surgery with Dr. Gregg Koldenhoven and started physical therapy once the stitches were removed. “I was in therapy for four months.”

Today Ron is back to being a handyman and back on a ladder, “I’m much more cautious where and how I set up my ladder,” he said.  “The strength in my ankle isn’t all there yet, but I’m still working on it.  I put great expectations on myself.  I want it to be instantaneous, but I know it takes time.  I may not get to 110% like I want, but I will make due with 95%.”  Ron said matter-of-factly. 

 

 

 

 


"Thank you Dr. Koldenhoven! Four years ago I couldn't walk five feet on the beach. Today I walked 4.3 miles on the beautiful beaches of Hawaii, with no problem!" 


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